Blue Lakes Breckenridge – The Complete Guide

By: Ashley Vitiello | Last Updated on December 22, 2023

Part scenic drive, part hike, and part exploration wonderland, Blue Lakes trail near Breckenridge, Colorado, is easily one of the best easy hikes in Breckenridge . Whether you’re hiking to the waterfall, rock climbing, letting your kids run around, or keeping your distance from the resident mountain goats, Blue Lakes is sure to be a fun day out in the Colorado sunshine. Not to be confused with Blue Lakes Colorado near Ridgway/Telluride in the southern mountains, these Blue Lakes are easily accessible by vehicle via Blue Lakes road, and are located just outside of beautiful Breckenridge.

The lakes at Blue Lakes Breckenridge hover right around tree line, a place where strong wind and heavy snowfall drive the landscape. There’s more rock than dirt, and these rocks house creatures such as marmot and pika. Because of the high altitude, you may want a light jacket or wind breaker even on warm summer days. On the north side of this valley lies Quandary Peak, Breckenridge’s local 14er. To the east is Hoosier Ridge, the line of mountains that spans from Hoosier Pass and includes Red Mountain, a difficult 13er with no designated trail. 

blue lakes breckenridge
View looking towards Lower Blue Lake from the dam. Hoosier Ridge and Red Mountain are in the distance. You can see some mountain goats on the rock outcropping.

Because of its beauty and ease of access, it’s one of the most heavily trafficked hiking trails in the area. To avoid the crowds, visit on a weekday or during the early morning or late afternoon. Avoid weekends and holidays, as parking fills up fast and it’s not worth the trouble of dealing with the crowds. Have a backup plan just in case the parking lot is full, that way you can do something else instead and try Blue Lakes trail another day. 

Lower Blue Lake

Hike to Blue Lakes Waterfall 

After you park at the lower lake, you’ll walk down the hill towards the bottom end of the lake. You’ll need to cross the lake’s outlet, then continue on the dirt road. It turns sharply to the right, and continue to follow this. Keep an eye out for an old mining structure on the left. You can still see the massive iron rope that was used to transport mining material from the mine up on the mountainside. 

Old mining structure on the left side of the trail.

The dirt road comes to an end at a clearing with several social trails meandering through the forest. Keep to the right to intersect the base of the waterfall, then you can explore more by climbing up the rocks and going higher up the cascading waterfall. Any exploration around the waterfall is going to be more of a moderate to difficult rating since it’s a rocky uphill climb. This is a great place to explore and enjoy the sound of the waterfall. Not as tall as nearby Continental Falls (on Mohawk Lakes Trail), but incredible nonetheless 

waterfall cascading down rocks near breckenridge
Part of Blue Lakes Waterfall

If you would like to see the upper part of the waterfall, you can keep going up, or you can retrace your steps back to your car and drive to the upper parking lot. From there, follow the road across the base of the dam and you can intersect the upper part of the waterfall from there. 

Hike to Monte Cristo Gulch

Monte Cristo Gulch trail is a much more challenging hike than the Blue Lakes Waterfall trail, but you’re rewarded with even more amazing views of the surrounding mountains. Because it’s more difficult and less known, you’ll be more likely to find some solitude as well. This valley is carpeted in wildflowers during the peak summer months and offering amazing views of Monte Cristo Gulch and Blue Lakes Valley. 

alpine lake surrounded by mountains
Upper Blue Lake as seen from the dam. The trail for Monte Cristo follows the right bank of the lake.

Hike Quandary Peak “West Ridge”

Quandary Peak is a local favorite 14er. From the Blue Lakes trailhead, you can take a class 3 climbing route called the “west ridge” as an alternate to the traditional Quandary Peak hike that begins down the road from Blue Lakes. This west ridge route is only for advanced hikers and requires route-finding and serious exposure. For more information about this route, 14ers.com has the best information. Watch this YouTube video for an awesome view of how difficult this climb is.

Sunset at Blue Lakes

Getting There

Leave Breckenridge Colorado on Main Street / Highway 9 heading south. Continue for about 8 miles, then take a right turn onto County Road 850. It’s directly after a curve in the road, so putting directions in Google maps may be helpful so you don’t miss the turn.

Follow this road all the way to the Blue Lakes area. While it’s unpaved, it’s easily do-able in most vehicles, although cars with lower clearance may need to take it slower. If you’re driving slower and someone is behind you, make sure to pull to the side so they can pass.

The first parking lot is at the outlet of the Lower Blue Lake, and there’s a second parking area at the outlet of the Upper Blue Lake near the dam. If you’re looking to walk to the waterfall, the best way to get there is to park at the lower lake. 

This road is closed seasonally, once the snow is too much to pass. This varies greatly each year, but typically you can plan on the road being inaccessible November through June. This leaves a small window for visiting, with the best time being July and early August for green summer adventures and wildflowers

group of mountain goats on a rocky hillside overlooking mountains
Mountain Goats at Blue Lakes

Camping at Blue Lakes

Just before you get to the lower lake parking area, there’s a dirt road that splits off to the left. If you follow this road, you can find some free dispersed camping. Spots are extremely limited and are more geared towards tent camping. You used to be able to camp farther up the road near the lower lake and waterfall, but as of 2021, camping in this area is banned. Please follow the law and do not camp in illegal spots. Follow the 7 Principles of Leave no Trace, which include camping at least 100 feet from water sources and packing out all trash. 

FAQ’s

How do you get to Blue Lakes Trail Breckenridge?

Leave Breckenridge on Main Street / Highway 9 heading south. Continue for about 8 miles, then take a right turn onto County Road 850. It’s directly after a curve in the road, so putting directions in Google maps may be helpful so you don’t miss the turn. Follow this road all the way to the Blue Lakes area.

Is Blue Lakes Road in Breckenridge open?

Blue Lakes Road in Breckenridge Colorado is closed seasonally for winter starting when the road becomes snowed in. If you are reading this during warmer months (June-September) it will be drivable all the way to right below the upper lake.  During winter months (November-April) the road will most likely be closed.  
When the road is closed during winter months you will have to park at a lot further down the road and hike 2 miles into the lakes.

Where are the mountain goats in Breckenridge?

Blue Lakes in Breckenridge Colorado has a considerable population of resident mountain goats that can be seen there very often! Please keep in mind that these are wild animals and do not approach, touch, or feed these beautiful creatures.

Can you camp at Blue Lakes in Breckenridge?

Just before you get to the lower lake parking area, there’s a dirt road that splits off to the left. If you follow this road, you can find some free dispersed camping on the dam of Lower Blue Lake. Spots are extremely limited and are more geared towards tent camping. You used to be able to camp farther up the road near the lower lake and waterfall, but as of 2021, camping in this area is banned. Please pay attention to the No Camping signs throughout the area.

Other Hikes

For some other hiking suggestions nearby, check out:

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About The Author

Ashley is an adventurous soul who loves all things nature, especially warm sunshine, wildflowers, scenic snacking, and mushrooms. She is an avid outdoor enthusiast who has spent years enjoying time outside doing things like hiking, camping, and rock climbing.
Her goal with Know Nothing Nomads is to make these hobbies easily accessible through knowledgeable content and how-to's based on all the stuff she's learned on her journey. If she isn't writing an article, she's probably in a forest looking at big mountain views and tiny pieces of moss on the side of the trail.

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We are Derek and Ashley of Know Nothing Nomads. Whether it is hiking, camping, or just generally being outside, we love it. We are so happy that you have found our little blog and hope that you stick around a while. Feel free to contact us with any questions or get in touch with us on social media!

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